Latest post Fri, Nov 18 2016 11:41 PM by jwrl. 18 replies.
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  • Thu, Nov 17 2016 9:30 AM In reply to

    • Bruno M
    • Top 200 Contributor
    • Joined on Thu, Feb 11 2010
    • London, UK
    • Posts 511
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    Re: Disk seems corrupted - what now?

    Have you tried using Spinrite?

    www.grc.com/spinrite.htm

    It uses some specialised techniques, (such as varying the velocity of the read heads) to recover data from faulty sectors of a hard disk. It might just work in your case.

    Bruno

    HP Z800, HP8760, SonnetFusion RAID, Mojo DX, Symphony 8.10, JVC DTV1910 HD tube monitor, HP Dreamcolor, Avid Artist Color [view my complete system specs]
  • Thu, Nov 17 2016 10:30 PM In reply to

    • jwrl
    • Top 25 Contributor
    • Joined on Thu, Oct 13 2005
    • Melbourne, Australia
    • Posts 8,365
    • Points 96,795

    Re: Disk seems corrupted - what now?

    If the reason that Avid is hanging is due to a corrupt media file, the folder move suggested earlier won't really help at all.  You need to physically move the media, forcing a full file rewrite.  The best way is to plug in a portable drive (USB 3 or better) and move half the contents of your Avid MediaFiles\MXF\n folder to a new Avid MediaFiles\MXF\1 folder on the portable drive.  The simplest way to do this is using MDV (Google it if you don't have it), but a simple  file copy and delete process will suffice.  (Avid MediaFiles\MXF\n?  Back to school time "where 'n' is any number").

    The steps to do this are:

    1.  With Avid closed open your folder containing the suspect media and click on the first file that you see.
    2.  Scroll down roughly halfway and holding the shift key, click on a file roughly in the middle of the window.
    3.  Right-click in the highlighted area and drag across to the Avid MediaFiles\MXF\1 folder on the new drive.
    4.  From the drop down menu that appears select "Move files".
    5.  Launch Avid and determine which folder fails.
    6.  Repeat until you isolate the file or files that are faulty.

    Because we may be looking at hardware problems with the drive, the move process outlined above may tell you immediately when you encounter a bad file without the need to launch Avid at all   If that's the case budget for a new hard drive.  Despite your feelings about it at the moment, that behaviour isn't symptomatic of a good drive.

    And in any case, definitely try Spinrite.  Its recovery ability can appear little short of miraculous - I know from experience.

    MC 7.0.4 - Asus P6T Deluxe V2 mobo - Intel i7 920 2.66GHz - Windows 7 Ult64 SP1 - nVidia Quadro FX 1800 - 16 Gbyte low latency DDR3 RAM - Internal 8 Tb... [view my complete system specs]
  • Thu, Nov 17 2016 10:49 PM In reply to

    • smyers63
    • Top 25 Contributor
    • Joined on Thu, Feb 16 2006
    • Dallas, Texas
    • Posts 3,770
    • Points 44,485
    • Moderator: MCA PC

    Re: Disk seems corrupted - what now?

    jwrl:

    If the reason that Avid is hanging is due to a corrupt media file, the folder move suggested earlier won't really help at all.  You need to physically move the media, forcing a full file rewrite.  The best way is to plug in a portable drive (USB 3 or better) and move half the contents of your Avid MediaFiles\MXF\n folder to a new Avid MediaFiles\MXF\1 folder on the portable drive.  The simplest way to do this is using MDV (Google it if you don't have it), but a simple  file copy and delete process will suffice.  (Avid MediaFiles\MXF\n?  Back to school time "where 'n' is any number").

    The steps to do this are:

    1.  With Avid closed open your folder containing the suspect media and click on the first file that you see.
    2.  Scroll down roughly halfway and holding the shift key, click on a file roughly in the middle of the window.
    3.  Right-click in the highlighted area and drag across to the Avid MediaFiles\MXF\1 folder on the new drive.
    4.  From the drop down menu that appears select "Move files".
    5.  Launch Avid and determine which folder fails.
    6.  Repeat until you isolate the file or files that are faulty.

    Because we may be looking at hardware problems with the drive, the move process outlined above may tell you immediately when you encounter a bad file without the need to launch Avid at all   If that's the case budget for a new hard drive.  Despite your feelings about it at the moment, that behaviour isn't symptomatic of a good drive.

    And in any case, definitely try Spinrite.  Its recovery ability can appear little short of miraculous - I know from experience.

    You and Jon misunderstood what I suggested.  What I suggested certainly does work because I've done it and I've done it more than once.

    You're saying to move possibly corrupt files into another folder that MC will scan.  I suggested moving the possibly  corrupt files into a folder MC would not scan.  I think that would show progress much quicker.  I wouldn't ever move suspected corrupt media files into yet another folder that would cause a problem again from being scanned. 

    The symptoms described variously indicated a bad drive or a good drive with corrupt files.  The symptoms described or the way they were being described weren't consistent.  He did say he ran chkdsk but didn't reveal the reuslts.  I'd have to assume without it being noted otherwise that the test was successful and that would not indicate a bad drive.

    Jon seems to want to start from scratch, though, with the media and the edit and that's his choice to make.

    Back to you. I've done all I can. Smile

    Sys. 1: Sony VAIO VPCF13UFX/B, Intel Core i7-740QM (1.73GHz), 4GB RAM, Windows 7 Home Premium (64-bit), Nvidia Geforce 310M, MC 8.7 Sys. 2: Acer Aspire... [view my complete system specs]

    Scott

  • Fri, Nov 18 2016 11:41 PM In reply to

    • jwrl
    • Top 25 Contributor
    • Joined on Thu, Oct 13 2005
    • Melbourne, Australia
    • Posts 8,365
    • Points 96,795

    Re: Disk seems corrupted - what now?

    Good point about using a folder not readable by Avid.  In scanning your post I missed that.

    My assumption was actually that if the file was on a faulty section of the hard drive the first indicator was likely to be that the copy process would fail.  Usually (but not always) you will get a similar result if the corruption is soft, i.e., the file itself is corrupt.  Either way you would never get to step 5 and the faulty media would be identified.  And if the fault was hardware related, Spinrite may still recover it.

    Just a different approach.  And your point about chkdsk is valid.  In fact I'd go further.  Corrupt data in the file header may still report as OK as far as chkdsk is concerned.  It's only one tool in the arsenal and not always the appropriate one.

    MC 7.0.4 - Asus P6T Deluxe V2 mobo - Intel i7 920 2.66GHz - Windows 7 Ult64 SP1 - nVidia Quadro FX 1800 - 16 Gbyte low latency DDR3 RAM - Internal 8 Tb... [view my complete system specs]
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