Latest post Tue, Feb 23 2016 12:43 PM by M-Edit. 10 replies.
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  • Fri, Feb 19 2016 7:15 PM

    • splouf
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    Import into MC subtitles done with Amara

    Hi there I am working on a multilingual documentary and my translators are working remotely and are doing the translations with the online tool Amara. I now need to import the translations back into Avid Media Composer in order to edit the rushes.

    Any ideas how to do it properly? Amara can export in several formats: 

    • SRT
    • SSA
    • TTML
    • TXT (untimed text transcript)
    • SBV
    • DFXP
    • VTT

    But once I try to import with SubCap it does not work. If I look at the file format, I am getting something like this:

    0:01:03.500,0:01:07.800

    On peut faire un thé avec ça.

    0:01:07.800,0:01:11.932

    C'est bon, viens, c'est bien.

    0:01:11.932,0:01:16.436

    Ça y est ? Oui.

     

    Any ideas how to convert / import properly?

    P.S. I would also like to make the Amara subtitles to markers in Avid.

    Thx

    Mac Book Pro 9,1, (2012) runnin MC 7.0.5.5355 on Yosemite 10.10.5 [view my complete system specs]
  • Sat, Feb 20 2016 6:00 PM In reply to

    • M-Edit
    • Top 500 Contributor
    • Joined on Thu, Jan 29 2009
    • Posts 226
    • Points 2,615

    Re: Import into MC subtitles done with Amara

    Hi.

    I'm not actually a MC user, now a more or less defunct Avid DS user,
    but I've been dealing a bit with the TWO subtitle-formats (at least
    it was two last time I checked) that the SubCap-effect can handle.

    One is the "Avid DS subtitle-format" which is actually just a textfile
    with the timecode and subtitle-rows "formatted" in a specific way.
    In a similar fashion to the example you are showing in the post.
    So below is an example of how an Avid DS subtitle file should have
    the information formatted. The "Header Section" and "Subtitle section"
    comments aren't really necessary, since all rows that starts with a @
    are considered to be "comments" and not imported, but they are there
    as a mere way of structuring the information visually between header data
    and subtitle data.

    The important tags are the <begin subtitles> and <end subtitles>.

    And without knowing the subtitleformat of the rows you have included
    in your post I guess that the last 3-figure numbers in the "timecode"
    are milliseconds, so in the rows below I've re-calculated those milliseconds
    into 25fps timecode. A 24 or 23,976fps would reguire som small
    adjustments. And the "." (dot) before the milliseconds have been
    substituted with a ":" (colon). Drop-frame timecode might require
    the colon to be a semi-colon instead.

    So if you paste the below rows into a textfile and save it as an
    Unicode textfile, the SubCap effect should be able to import it.

    @~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    @ Header section
    @~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    @ This section was for formatting text on Avid DS import
    @ but has no function in the SubCap effect

    @~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    @ Subtitles section
    @~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    <begin subtitles>

    00:01:03:13 00:01:07:20
    On peut faire un thé avec ça.

    00:01:07:20 00:01:11:23
    C'est bon, viens, c'est bien.

    00:01:11:23 00:01:16:11
    Ça y est ? Oui.

    <end subtitles>


    The other format that the SubCap effect can handle is another
    "old" format called EBU19, which is a binary format and has
    the file-extension ".STL".

    The advantage here over the Avid (*.TXT) format is that the
    EBU19-format can handle info for Italics, Underline and if the
    subtitle should be "BOXED" or not. The last function means if
    the subtitle should be presented against some kind of background.

    And I believe the BOXED-property isn't anything that can be interpreted
    or handled by the majority of NLE-softwares importers or plugin's
    by todays date anyway.

    But the really sad thing is that the SubCap effect can't handle
    any of these THREE formatting options. They just get ignored.
    UNDERLINE and BOXING might not be so important, but it
    would have been nice to know if certain subtitles were supposed
    to be in ITALICS of not.

    So a translator might have ment some subtitles to be in ITALICS
    but just by using the SubCap effect you wouldn't know of it.

    I've used the exellent (and free) subtitle software "Subtitle Edit"
    previously to be able to tell which lines are in italics.

    https://github.com/SubtitleEdit/subtitleedit/releases

    It's also a great converter between certain subtitle-formats.

    But since you're on a Mac, and I'm a PC-person I don't have any
    recommendations for a simliar Mac-software. But someone on this
    forum hopefully have.

    Anyway I hope this shed som light over your convert/import issues.

    Cheers

    //Mike-E

     

  • Sun, Feb 21 2016 4:16 PM In reply to

    • splouf
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    • Joined on Thu, Mar 6 2014
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    Re: Import into MC subtitles done with Amara

    Thanks a lot 

    M-Edit:
     with your explanations it is really appreaciated. I have a friend who do has Annotation Edit, a software that can convert miliseconds timecode files to regular NLE-software compatible timecodes. 

    An other thing would you know how to incorporate thoses subtitles into markers instead of text layers? That could be really usefull to find words in the several timelines.

    Mac Book Pro 9,1, (2012) runnin MC 7.0.5.5355 on Yosemite 10.10.5 [view my complete system specs]
  • Mon, Feb 22 2016 3:29 PM In reply to

    Re: Import into MC subtitles done with Amara

    The markers text format is just plain tab delimited text:

     

    igor 01:00:00:13 V2 red next one will start with CR

    igor 01:00:04:17 V2 green two markers, one no text

     

    The format is: NAME TC TRACK COLOR [NOTE]. The new spanned markers have additional information. It's easy to convert from the subtitle file to markers. I thought I had written a script for this but I've done the opposite--convert from markers to subtitles.

    Igor Ridanovic

    www.HDhead.com

  • Mon, Feb 22 2016 8:15 PM In reply to

    • splouf
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    • Joined on Thu, Mar 6 2014
    • Posts 10
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    Re: Import into MC subtitles done with Amara

    Igor Ridanovic:

    The format is: NAME TC TRACK COLOR [NOTE]. 

    OK good to know. But how to import them with SubCap as well?

    Also do you know how to offset the timecodes from a subtitled text. Let say I want to import a  txt file of 01:58:12:13 late? I don't see any options in SubCap to do so...

    That is because the timecode refers to the selected clip but not the entire sequence, so I need to adjust to import because SubCap sees that the TC does not match (obviously). Any tips or clues would be much appreaciated.

    Mac Book Pro 9,1, (2012) runnin MC 7.0.5.5355 on Yosemite 10.10.5 [view my complete system specs]
  • Mon, Feb 22 2016 8:23 PM In reply to

    Re: Import into MC subtitles done with Amara

    splouf:

    OK good to know. But how to import them with SubCap as well?

    Also do you know how to offset the timecodes from a subtitled text. 

     

    Well, you can't import them into SubCap until you convert them to DS subtitle format that Mike has mentioned. It has to be done via a third party tool. Just last week I wrote a similar Python script that converts from DCP subtitle files to DS subtitles for the purpose of importing into DS. I ran into the same offset issue and implemented TC offset functionality.

    One non-automatic way to offset the timecode if you have SubCap compatible files is to import them to the timeline whereever they may fall and then select all the subtitle effects and slide them left or right. However, if the timecode referenced in the files starts before the start of your sequence, the SubCap will report an error and fail to import all out of range subtitles.

    Igor Ridanovic

    www.HDhead.com

  • Mon, Feb 22 2016 8:29 PM In reply to

    Re: Import into MC subtitles done with Amara

    I meant to say "for the purpose of importing into Media Composer" not the DS. Although DS import would work as well.

    Igor Ridanovic

    www.HDhead.com

  • Mon, Feb 22 2016 9:06 PM In reply to

    • splouf
    • Not Ranked
    • Joined on Thu, Mar 6 2014
    • Posts 10
    • Points 140

    Re: Import into MC subtitles done with Amara

    Igor Ridanovic:

    Well, you can't import them into SubCap until you convert them to DS subtitle format that Mike has mentioned. It has to be done via a third party tool. Just last week I wrote a similar Python script that converts from DCP subtitle files to DS subtitles for the purpose of importing into DS. I ran into the same offset issue and implemented TC offset functionality.

    One non-automatic way to offset the timecode if you have SubCap compatible files is to import them to the timeline whereever they may fall and then select all the subtitle effects and slide them left or right. However, if the timecode referenced in the files starts before the start of your sequence, the SubCap will report an error and fail to import all out of range subtitles.

    Thanks Igor I am aware of the conversion needed before importing, that is why my friend is helping me with his Annotation Edit sofware that can do the convertion properly. I will see with him if his convertion tool can actually offset the timecode directly or I need to move it manually once imported in the timeline. Oh I cannot even import the file because the timecode starts at 01:00:00:00 .... The offset is a big issue here.

     

     

    Mac Book Pro 9,1, (2012) runnin MC 7.0.5.5355 on Yosemite 10.10.5 [view my complete system specs]
  • Mon, Feb 22 2016 9:20 PM In reply to

    Re: Import into MC subtitles done with Amara

    You could import SubCap effects to a dummy sequence with a starting timecode that matches the subtitle timecode and then edit from that sequence into yours. It's pedestrian but it would get the job done if the offset is required.

    If you need full hour offsets only, that's trivial to implement on the script level. You just need to add or subtract from the HH field keeping in mind that hour 23 is maximum hour.

    Igor Ridanovic

    www.HDhead.com

  • Mon, Feb 22 2016 9:56 PM In reply to

    • M-Edit
    • Top 500 Contributor
    • Joined on Thu, Jan 29 2009
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    • Points 2,615

    Re: Import into MC subtitles done with Amara

    But...

    ..."Annotation Edit" seems to be a very competent software, by it's feature list?
    With a massive amount of import and export formats.
    And maybe you might kind of expect that, since it's not exactly free.
    Not super-expensive though, but it will strip you off around 245 Euros.

    Unfortunately I can't install the demo it since I don't own a Mac, but I really have
    a hard time believing that this software isn't capable of offsetting timecodes.

    So I really believe your friend will be able to solve your "offset anxienty".

    In a PC-based-enviroment though, I think that the free "Subtitle Edit" would have
    managed this "offset business" brilliantly.

    Cheers.

    //Mike-E

     

     

  • Tue, Feb 23 2016 12:43 PM In reply to

    • M-Edit
    • Top 500 Contributor
    • Joined on Thu, Jan 29 2009
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    Re: Import into MC subtitles done with Amara

    Okey, so I've just realized that the SubCap effect reads the "timecode offset" info
    in an Avid DS formatted subtitle file. I thought that it was only the Avid DS import
    that could do that.

    So by putting

    <timecode offset> 01:00:00:00

    somewhere before the <begin subtitles>-tag
    will add one hour to all timecode numbers at import.

    And putting a minus-sign before the timecode offset number
    in the above example will subtract one hour of all the timecodes at import.

    So if your timeline starts at 01:00:00:00: and your first subtitle
    starts at 00:01:03:13, put...

    <timecode offset> 01:00:00:00

    ...at the start of the Avid DS formatted subtitle file,
    and you should at least be in the right timecode-hour-segment
    and then you should be able to drag them to exact timecode-position.

    Like so...


    @~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    @ Header section
    @~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    <timecode offset> 01:00:00:00

    @~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    @ Subtitles section
    @~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    <begin subtitles>

    00:01:03:13 00:01:07:20
    On peut faire un thé avec ça.

    00:01:07:20 00:01:11:23
    C'est bon, viens, c'est bien.

    00:01:11:23 00:01:16:11
    Ça y est ? Oui.

    <end subtitles>


    But if you know the exakt timecode offset number, lets say 01:00:02:23,
    you could of course put that in to avoid un-necessary dragging of the subtitles. :-)

    Cheers.

    //Mike-E

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